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Dog Lover

General vaccination guidelines

Follow recommendations from your veterinarian for your individual pet. Generally speaking, it is advised to have dogs avoiding situations and areas where high infection is possible (dog parks, doggy day care, kennels, around dogs not up to date on vaccinations or those who have unknown vaccination status). 

 

Canine vaccinations:

DA2PP (Distemper, adenovirus type 2, parvovirus, parainfluenza): puppy series is 3 rounds: 8 weeks, 12 weeks, 16 weeks. This vaccine is a core vaccination.  Boost annually or per your veterinarian and the vaccine manufacturer’s recommendations. This vaccination may also be called “DHPP”, which is the same thing. It is essential for puppies to receive this vaccination as this ensures full protection from all of these dangerous viruses. 

Rabies: Rabies virus. This vaccine is a core vaccine. Vaccination schedule is to administer one at 16 weeks of age then boost at 12 months. Rabies, although relatively uncommon, is zoonotic meaning that it can be transmitted from an animal to humans. It is the law to have your pet vaccinated for rabies. Continue annually or per your veterinarian and the vaccine manufacturer’s recommendations. 

Bordetella (kennel cough): this is a non-core vaccination that is recommended based on lifestyle. If your pet is going to kennels, dog parks, doggy day-care, anywhere that they are interacting with another dog it is recommended that this vaccination be administered. This is a 1-year annual vaccination that is given either via injection, intra-nasally or orally. 

 

Feline vaccinations:

FVRCP (Feline herpesvirus 1, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia): The kitten series is 3 rounds: 8 weeks, 12 weeks, 16 weeks. Boost annually or per your veterinarian and the vaccine manufacturer’s recommendations. This vaccine is a core vaccine, meaning that ALL cats (even those who do not go outside) should be vaccinated. All three viruses are highly contagious and your feline friend does not need to come into contact with an infected cat to become sick; exposure through anything contaminated can transmit the virus. 

Rabies: Rabies virus.  Vaccination schedule is to administer one at 16 weeks of age, then boost at 12 months. This vaccination is a core vaccine. Rabies, although relatively uncommon, is zoonotic meaning that it can be transmitted from an animal to humans. It is the law to have your pet vaccinated for rabies. Continue annually or per your veterinarian and the vaccine manufacturer’s recommendations.

Feline Leukemia: This vaccination is a non-core vaccine. In kittens and at-risk adult cats (cats who go outdoors, go to grooming, boarding, or have any exposure to other cats) it is advised to give 2 doses administered 4 weeks apart. A kitten can receive this vaccination as young as 8 weeks. Prior to initial vaccination for feline leukemia virus, a blood test to check for antibodies for feline leukemia or feline immunodeficiency virus is required. 

Important note regarding Feline Leukemia: A cat should be screened for feline leukemia virus if any of the following apply: at time of acquisition of the cat, before the initial feline leukemia vaccine, after exposure to an infected cat, when a cat is clinically ill, or before introducing a new cat to a multi-cat household). 

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